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Unless it's your pet rat or mouse in a cage (which may still cause some family members to jump on a chair if it gets loose!), any rodent in the home is not a good thing. Not only are rats and mice a nasty nuisance, they can contaminate food, chew up important papers and wiring, and spread disease.

How do you keep rats and mice out of the house - without using poison? 

Tips to Keep Rats and Mice Out of the House

Don't feed the birds! Birds aren't always neat eaters, they will let much of the seed fall to the ground, where it provides a free and easy meal for rodents and other wildlife and insects (such as squirrels, geese, and even ants) to hang around your house.

Don't leave your garage door open for extended periods, especially overnight. This is an open invitation for rats, mice, and wildlife (including unwanted wild people!) to enter and take shelter, potentially making their way into your home as well.

Don't store 50 pounds of dog food in your garage. The aroma of pet food, bird seed, or grass seed can attract the rodents, so it must be kept in airtight containers. While that metal trash can and lid may indeed keep mice from getting to your dog food, they won't realize that until after the smell has lured them into your garage.

The same should be said about the enticing aroma of garbage. Controlling these smells can mean all the difference between having no mice and having several families of them nesting in your garage and eventually in your walls.

Seal your air conditioner lines and other gaps that are the size of a dime or larger.

Resist overdoing it on the landscaping. Abundant, dense plant life near the home creates an irresistible sanctuary and safe haven for rodents just outside your home. Unfortunately, the same lush beautiful landscaping so many of us admire and aspire to have are just as attractive to many of the pests we want to keep out of our homes.

Clean up spilled "mouse food" immediately. A few pieces of dog food on the garage floor or some spilled bird or grass seed will be irresistible to a hungry mouse outside.

Signs of Rodent Presence
When a mouse or rat decides to visit, it's rarely seen. Usually, signs that rats or mice have invaded your home are chewed holes in boxes and bags of dry goods in a pantry or dog food and grass seed bags in the garage.

Rodents have been known to chew through electrical wiring, causing expensive repairs, or even causing fires. Often, it's their droppings (feces) that are noticed first. But the true danger in a mouse or rat's visit is often invisible. Various diseases, including Hantavirus, are transmitted by the accidental inhalation of dust from a rodent's dried urine.

The most effective way to control a rodent population in your home is prevention. With a little bit of garage cleaning, yard work, and caulking, you can avoid the major hassle of extensive cleanup that is necessary, even if only one or two mice have a party in your pantry.

Rodent Solutions offers rodent proofing services to prevent rodent infestation.

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Rodent-Proofing Your Premises

Rodent-Proofing Your Premises

Everyone strives for a Rodent-free home.

Rodent-proofing your home, apartment, farm or other buildings involves identifying and eliminating the conditions that make it possible for rats and mice to survive - mainly their food, water and harborage. Once you know the problem areas, follow the four major steps below to reduce or eliminate these conditions.

Keeping Rodents Out of Your Home or Other Buildings

1. Remove Sources of Food & Water
Improving sanitation conditions is one of the best ways to prevent and to get rid of rodent problems. Rats and mice are opportunistic feeders that will eat any food discarded by humans. Eliminating their food and water is critical to controlling them.

Outdoors:
Pick up trash and discarded food.
Keep tightly sealed lids on garbage cans.
Store pet and bird food in sealed containers.
Get rid of standing water by filling holes or unlevel places in the yard where puddles might form or by eliminating standing water in buckets, pools, or other containers.

Indoors:
Clean up spilled food in cupboards and on floors.
Keep counters and food preparation areas clear of food at night.
Keep all food packages tightly sealed.


2. Get Rid of Rodent Habitats

Outdoors:
Remove clutter and debris.
Keep grass, shrubs, and other vegetation around your home trimmed.
Trim overhanging trees that cause shadowy areas where rodents feel protected.

Indoors:
Clear out boxes and other clutter in basements and storage areas.
Store materials off the floors on shelves, wherever possible.

3. Keep Rodents From Entering Cracks & Crevices 

Rats can fit through an opening about the size of a nickel. Mice can squeeze through an area smaller than a dime. Call Rodent Solutions to seal your home and prevent rodents from entering.  


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Winter's Chill Drives Rodents Indoors

Across the country, chilly temperatures and early snowstorms are forcing more than just people indoors. Rodents including micerats and squirrels are seeking food, water and shelter in homes. Unfortunately, more bad weather could be on the way as the Farmers' Almanac is forecasting a season of unusually cold and stormy weather. The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) encourages homeowners to take the necessary steps to protect themselves and their families from rodent infestations during colder months.

"Rodents invade an estimated 21 million homes in the United States every winter," said Missy Henriksen, vice president of public affairs for NPMA. "But with many places already experiencing cold weather conditions, it is important to be proactive and vigilant in preventing these pests from becoming unwelcome houseguests."

The accumulation of feces from mice and rats can spread bacteria and contaminate food sources. These rodent droppings are known to trigger allergies and cause diseases including Hantavirus and Salmonella. In addition to health risks, rodents can chew through wallboards, cardboard, wood and even electrical wiring, increasing the risk of a house fire.

NPMA offers the following tips to avoid a rodent infestation:

  • Store items in boxes and plastic sealed containers, rather than cardboard boxes.
  • Keep food in airtight containers and dispose of garbage regularly.
  • Install screens over chimney vents and openings.
  • Seal cracks and holes on the outside of the home, including areas where utilities and pipes enter the home.
  • Replace loose mortar and weather stripping around basement foundation and windows.
  • Install gutters or diverts to channel water away from your home.
  • Store firewood at least 20 feet from the home and five feet off the ground.
  • Inspect wires, insulation and walls for any signs of gnaw marks.
  • If you find rodent feces, hear sounds of scurrying in the walls or observe other signs of an infestation, contact a licensed pest professional.

For more information about household pests and to find a local pest professional, visit www.pestworld.org.

Source: http://www.pestworld.org/news-hub/press-releases/early-arrival-of-winter-weather-drives-rodents-indoors/

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